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Other Plants Discussion of all other types of plants besides bananas.


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Old 09-20-2017, 02:27 PM   #1 (permalink)
 
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Default Miscanthus Giganteus

I first saw it growing at a house two blocks away and mistook it as a variety of bamboo:


I later discovered that it was a grass and bought rhizomes from Maple River Farms - Your Source For Miscanthus X Giganteus Rhizomes

Here are my plants after 2 years:


I will post more pictures after it goes to tassel.

The most remarkable characteristic of this plant is that it is insensitive to fertigation under normal soil conditions. Another unusual characteristic is that it is relatively efficient at doing photosynthesis. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miscanthus_giganteus. On a dry weight, albeit not a wet weight bases, it grows faster than any musa.
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Old 09-21-2017, 07:12 AM   #2 (permalink)
 
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Default Re: Miscanthus Giganteus

Quote:
Originally Posted by aruzinsky View Post
I first saw it growing at a house two blocks away and mistook it as a variety of bamboo:


I later discovered that it was a grass and bought rhizomes from Maple River Farms - Your Source For Miscanthus X Giganteus Rhizomes

Here are my plants after 2 years:


I will post more pictures after it goes to tassel.

The most remarkable characteristic of this plant is that it is insensitive to fertigation under normal soil conditions. Another unusual characteristic is that it is relatively efficient at doing photosynthesis. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miscanthus_giganteus. On a dry weight, albeit not a wet weight bases, it grows faster than any musa.
Give it room, it will spread. It is tough to dig up when it is established.
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Old 09-21-2017, 08:23 AM   #3 (permalink)
 
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Default Re: Miscanthus Giganteus

Quote:
Originally Posted by Iowa View Post
Give it room, it will spread. It is tough to dig up when it is established.
The clump in the first photo is decades old. I don't know what the homeowner did to contain it, but, apparently, it can be done.

Have you tried Glyphosate around the edges of the clump?
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Old 09-21-2017, 11:48 AM   #4 (permalink)
 
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Default Re: Miscanthus Giganteus

Quote:
Originally Posted by aruzinsky View Post
The clump in the first photo is decades old. I don't know what the homeowner did to contain it, but, apparently, it can be done.

Have you tried Glyphosate around the edges of the clump?
I use large rocks around mine, it contains it. If I cut some out I use a saws all with a 12" pruning blade. If you keep it mowed where you don't want it that works too.

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Old 09-21-2017, 04:54 PM   #5 (permalink)
 
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Default Re: Miscanthus Giganteus

GIANT REED GRASS





This is a nice plant but invasive in warmer areas, here it's a tender perennial. I lost this to a late April cold snap, again. After cutting and digging 2 pickup loads of roots I did not plant it again. At 22' tall it looks great. next to it on the left in the second pic is some Miscanthus Giganteus, a little hard to see.

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Old 09-22-2017, 08:58 AM   #6 (permalink)
 
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Default Re: Miscanthus Giganteus

Quote:
Originally Posted by Iowa View Post
GIANT REED GRASS





This is a nice plant but invasive in warmer areas, here it's a tender perennial. I lost this to a late April cold snap, again. After cutting and digging 2 pickup loads of roots I did not plant it again. At 22' tall it looks great. next to it on the left in the second pic is some Miscanthus Giganteus, a little hard to see.
Thank you for making me aware of Giant Reed Grass. Wikipedia has a lot of interesting things to say about it:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arundo_donax .

In particular, it concerns me that the plant is a fire hazard. Also, unlike Miscanthus Giganteus, it responds to fertilizer when young.

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Old 09-22-2017, 09:29 AM   #7 (permalink)
 
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Default Re: Miscanthus Giganteus

Quote:
Originally Posted by aruzinsky View Post
Thank you for making me aware of Giant Reed Grass. Wikipedia has a lot of interesting things to say about it:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arundo_donax .

In particular, it concerns me that the plant is a fire hazard. Also, unlike Miscanthus Giganteus, it responds to fertilizer when young.
I didn't have any fire problems, grown it for several years. Any dry flammable plant material is a fire hazard though.
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Old 09-22-2017, 10:31 AM   #8 (permalink)
 
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Default Re: Miscanthus Giganteus

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Any dry flammable plant material is a fire hazard though.
Wikipedia said, "It is highly flammable throughout the year." which implied that it is also flammable while green.
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Old 09-22-2017, 01:08 PM   #9 (permalink)
 
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Default Re: Miscanthus Giganteus

Quote:
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Wikipedia said, "It is highly flammable throughout the year." which implied that it is also flammable while green.
That's interesting.
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Old 09-23-2017, 09:07 PM   #10 (permalink)
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Default Re: Miscanthus Giganteus

This is a beautiful plant...but it it is incredibly invasive once let loose, and it will get loose.

The plant is the kudzu of the wetlands, an absolute habitat destroyer.
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Old 09-24-2017, 10:42 AM   #11 (permalink)
 
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Default Re: Miscanthus Giganteus

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Originally Posted by cincinnana View Post
This is a beautiful plant...but it it is incredibly invasive once let loose, and it will get loose.

The plant is the kudzu of the wetlands, an absolute habitat destroyer.
Someone might incorrectly conclude that you are referring to Miscanthus Giganteus instead of Arundo Donax, especially if the former is more beautiful than the latter in the eyes of the beholder.

I just remembered that, around 2003, the TV show, 60 Minutes, had a story about (what someone else told me was) Aundo Donax growing in the marshes of Iraq (60 Minutes didn't mention the botanical name). The Arab natives made houses entirely out of it. The houses of the wealthiest were large and elaborate, sort of reed mansions. These houses were amazing. See https://www.google.com/search?q=%22h...w=1280&bih=641

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Old 09-25-2017, 06:04 PM   #12 (permalink)
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Default Re: Miscanthus Giganteus

Quote:
Originally Posted by aruzinsky View Post
Someone might incorrectly conclude that you are referring to Miscanthus Giganteus instead of Arundo Donax, especially if the former is more beautiful than the latter in the eyes of the beholder.

I just remembered that, around 2003, the TV show, 60 Minutes, had a story about (what someone else told me was) Aundo Donax growing in the marshes of Iraq (60 Minutes didn't mention the botanical name). The Arab natives made houses entirely out of it. The houses of the wealthiest were large and elaborate, sort of reed mansions. These houses were amazing. See https://www.google.com/search?q=%22h...w=1280&bih=641
Thanks for the clarification...

You are right, Both plants are very invasive and beautiful in the right conditions.


Yet both are invasive in the right conditions.
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Old 09-25-2017, 06:56 PM   #13 (permalink)
 
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Default Re: Miscanthus Giganteus

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Thanks for the clarification...

You are right, Both plants are very invasive and beautiful in the right conditions.


Yet both are invasive in the right conditions.
This is very true of a lot of plants, even Banana Plants are invasive in the right conditions.
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Old 09-26-2017, 08:16 AM   #14 (permalink)
 
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Default Re: Miscanthus Giganteus

Speaking of invasive plants, I recently learned that white poplar trees are not endemic to the U.S., but, instead, brought over in 1748. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Populus_alba .

As a child, I vacationed in Lac Du Flambeau, Wisconsin, which had many white poplar trees growing near lake shores (the only other white trees were birch). Of course, I assumed that those trees belonged there so now it is a big surprise (almost a shock) to learn that they didn't.
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Old 09-26-2017, 08:31 AM   #15 (permalink)
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Default Re: Miscanthus Giganteus

went to drill a well at a home once, there were large trees on the place big beautiful leaves. never see one like that before, nice shade. that was when we didn't nave cell phones. don't know what they were but they had took over the whole yard, going into the neighbors yards. even coming up thru the boards on the porch. it was spreading thru the root system. I dug a few small ones thinking to plant them at my place, the I thought better of it. it probably would have killed my septic system. I don't believe root rid would have kept up.

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