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Old 08-12-2007, 04:56 PM   #1 (permalink)
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Talking My Coconut palm from supermarket! (help)

Well i've taken 2 photos of the coconut i've been interested into the very tropical palms and "Cocos Nucifera" seemed to be the best idea too me. yes i know the "project" idea is risky for my weather so don't lecture about it! Thanks. well heres two pictures Any ideas or photos of your own would help!



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Old 08-12-2007, 07:16 PM   #2 (permalink)
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Default Re: My Coconut palm from supermarket! (help)

Wayne,

Looks like a mooses a-hole. In a pot no less! I spent some time in Toronto, Eh? Don't ask.

Best of luck. I tried and tried to grow tropicals throughout the subfreezing temperatures of central NJ for 18 years. And I never gave up. So should you, Eh?

Dan
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Old 08-13-2007, 06:55 AM   #3 (permalink)
 
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Default Re: My Coconut palm from supermarket! (help)

I had one last year with big leafs, it grew well in the summer outside but
I didn't managed to get it trough the winter inside the house, I think the air
is too dry in the house.

Ron
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Old 08-13-2007, 10:42 AM   #4 (permalink)
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Default Re: My Coconut palm from supermarket! (help)

Quote:
Originally Posted by the flying dutchman View Post
I think the air
is too dry in the house.

Ron
I think you needed to increase the humidity. or if thats not the case more warmth, or more light 20 WATT spectrum ligths could do the job maybe 2.
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Old 08-13-2007, 11:22 AM   #5 (permalink)
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Default Re: My Coconut palm from supermarket! (help)

[quote=Musa_Cavandish;16546]Well i've taken 2 photos of the coconut i've been interested into the very tropical palms and "Cocos Nucifera" seemed to be the best idea too me. yes i know the "project" idea is risky for my weather so don't lecture about it! Thanks. well heres two pictures Any ideas or photos of your own would help!

coconuts will sometimes germinate but (removal of the husk) makes this unlikely. Fresh seeds should be placed on damp peat with the broadest surface downwards at a temperature of 24-27C. The seed germinates slowly, taking up to 4 months before the shoot appears. During germination, the single cotyledon (seed leaf) grows inside the seed cavity. Its sheath protects the seedling root and shoot and grows with them through the softest of the three eyes at the base of the shell. Part of the cotyledon, the coconut apple, enlarges into the cavity inside the coconut and absorbs nutrients from the endosperm and coconut water. Because the seedling has access to this food source, it can grow for some time before making contact with the soil.

Seedlings still attached to the coconut can be obtained from some suppliers. These will survive for a few years but do not make ideal house plants as they require constant high humidity and temperatures. They should be grown on a well-drained sandy soil rich in lime and potash. Seedlings with the seed attached should not be transplanted until the connection with the seed has shrivelled. In containers coconuts may be expected to reach up to 2 m in height with pinnate leaves of a similar length.

This article comes from Kew the Royal Botanic Garden. It hard to tell by the picture but I don't see the husk on your seed. john
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Old 08-13-2007, 11:41 AM   #6 (permalink)
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Default Re: My Coconut palm from supermarket! (help)

[quote=johndeltav;16579]
Quote:
Originally Posted by Musa_Cavandish View Post
Well i've taken 2 photos of the coconut i've been interested into the very tropical palms and "Cocos Nucifera" seemed to be the best idea too me. yes i know the "project" idea is risky for my weather so don't lecture about it! Thanks. well heres two pictures Any ideas or photos of your own would help!

coconuts will sometimes germinate but (removal of the husk) makes this unlikely. Fresh seeds should be placed on damp peat with the broadest surface downwards at a temperature of 24-27C. The seed germinates slowly, taking up to 4 months before the shoot appears. During germination, the single cotyledon (seed leaf) grows inside the seed cavity. Its sheath protects the seedling root and shoot and grows with them through the softest of the three eyes at the base of the shell. Part of the cotyledon, the coconut apple, enlarges into the cavity inside the coconut and absorbs nutrients from the endosperm and coconut water. Because the seedling has access to this food source, it can grow for some time before making contact with the soil.

Seedlings still attached to the coconut can be obtained from some suppliers. These will survive for a few years but do not make ideal house plants as they require constant high humidity and temperatures. They should be grown on a well-drained sandy soil rich in lime and potash. Seedlings with the seed attached should not be transplanted until the connection with the seed has shrivelled. In containers coconuts may be expected to reach up to 2 m in height with pinnate leaves of a similar length.

This article comes from Kew the Royal Botanic Garden. It hard to tell by the picture but I don't see the husk on your seed. john
Well Look at this link http://forums.gardenweb.com/forums/l...3222100.html?7
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Old 08-13-2007, 01:29 PM   #7 (permalink)
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Default Re: My Coconut palm from supermarket! (help)

[quote=Musa_Cavandish;16580]
Quote:
Originally Posted by johndeltav View Post
coconut palm 10a,
many grocery store coconuts will not sprout now for some reason, or if they do, they soon die. I think that this is for a combination of reasons. First, I think something is being done to them either before they are shipped from overseas or once they arrive at U.S. ports. I have heard rumores that they are being radiated or gassed to prevent pest infestations here. Second, I think that they are being handled and thrown around much more roughly by the shipping crews than they used to be. (There really is almost NO quality work done by any nowadays!) This rough handling could cause hairline cracks in the nut that you can't see when you buy them. And third, for some STUPID reason, the produce importers and grocers are refrigerating them now, which they did not do in the past. As anyone with any sense knows, this destroys the freshness of tropical fruits (put a banana in the refrigerator and watch it turn black!) and for those of us who want to grown tropical fruits, prolonged exposure to cold temperatures near 40 degrees or below, can kill the seed.
If you do decide to try to grow a grocery store coconut, try to find a large one with the husk first and foremost. The ones with the husk on them stand a much better chance of germinating than do the unhusked ones. Set it out in full sun in warm weather for a few weeks to make sure it browns up, then shake it to make sure it has plenty of milk and if it does, it is ready to plant

It seems coconut palm is saying the same thing.If they have a husk they have a better chance of making it after they sprout. Good luck john
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Old 08-13-2007, 01:33 PM   #8 (permalink)
 
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Default Re: My Coconut palm from supermarket! (help)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Musa_Cavandish View Post
I think you needed to increase the humidity. or if thats not the case more warmth, or more light 20 WATT spectrum ligths could do the job maybe 2.
Yes, you are right about that and I must say it was not in the best shape
when I brought it in because due to rain and low temps at the end of the summer there were black spots on the leafs. My neigbour had the same
coconut under a roof all the time and that one was in better shape but
died also in winter.
Well, anyway a lot of succes and I hope you let us know how
it goes on.

Ron
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