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Other Plants Discussion of all other types of plants besides bananas.


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Old 02-24-2012, 12:26 AM   #21 (permalink)
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Default Re: Hood Pear

When I "spray" garden plants, it is late in the day when most bees have gone home for the evening. I use lightweight "kill on contact" insecticides rather than the systemic or heavy residual type.

We have European and slightly Africanized European bees, the native sand bees, carpenter bees, and bumble bees. I purposely put year-round flowering plants in the orchard and near pollen-critical plants to keep the bees coming all year. This way, when a plant with a short fertility window has its flowers open, the bees are already there. In my zone, both trailing rosemary and mexican heather (Cuphea hyssopifolia) have got some kind of flower going all year. I also have Salvias around, particularly the native Cleveland Sage which blooms frequently enough to keep the local critters interest. Of course Tony (sunfish) will attest that I don't keep up with the weeds so there are plenty of those blooming at various times too.
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Old 02-24-2012, 01:02 AM   #22 (permalink)
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Default Re: Hood Pear

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When I "spray" garden plants, it is late in the day when most bees have gone home for the evening. I use lightweight "kill on contact" insecticides rather than the systemic or heavy residual type.

We have European and slightly Africanized European bees, the native sand bees, carpenter bees, and bumble bees. I purposely put year-round flowering plants in the orchard and near pollen-critical plants to keep the bees coming all year. This way, when a plant with a short fertility window has its flowers open, the bees are already there. In my zone, both trailing rosemary and mexican heather (Cuphea hyssopifolia) have got some kind of flower going all year. I also have Salvias around, particularly the native Cleveland Sage which blooms frequently enough to keep the local critters interest. Of course Tony (sunfish) will attest that I don't keep up with the weeds so there are plenty of those blooming at various times too.
Keeping something around to attract bees is something I have been thinking about. I am not sure if it is needed since I have a wooded creek bottom on the property and perhaps there are many flowering things there. I will have to study this and learn more. Another route is to keep a beehive going.
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Old 02-24-2012, 01:23 AM   #23 (permalink)
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Default Re: Hood Pear

I let my broccolli flower (about 90' of row) and there are bees every where. I was very happy to see such numbers as I have my blueberries in bloom and the citrus isn't far behind. I know the Southeastern Blueberry Bee does most of the work but I have seen three different types working the flowers. Hoping for a big harvest.
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Old 03-24-2012, 08:29 PM   #24 (permalink)
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Default Re: Hood Pear

I wanted to update this.

One month later I still having blooming broccolli, mustard greens and turnips. Some of these plants are over six feet tall and have hundreds of bright yellow blooms. My citrus is almost through blooming and I have had multiple bees on every tree anytime I have been in the garden. I would consider this to be a complete success. A side benefit is the mass of green stuff for the compost bin!
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Old 04-09-2012, 09:36 PM   #25 (permalink)
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Default Re: Hood Pear

Pears grown in the shape of the Buddha - Boing Boing
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Old 04-10-2012, 01:22 PM   #26 (permalink)
 
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Default Re: Hood Pear

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Where to buy?
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Old 04-10-2012, 01:50 PM   #27 (permalink)
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Default Re: Hood Pear

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Where to buy?
The mold I don't know.Maybe you could use an empty honey jar and have a bear shaped pear.
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Old 04-10-2012, 03:41 PM   #28 (permalink)
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Default Re: Hood Pear

Why not use some of the giant pears that are round. There are pears that include many of the asian and also the southern orient pears that are soft ball size and can be very round. Perhaps mold/grow them into jackolaterns, store in the fridge, and give them out at halloween.
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Old 04-11-2012, 09:53 AM   #29 (permalink)
 
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Default Re: Hood Pear

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Originally Posted by sunfish View Post
The mold I don't know.Maybe you could use an empty honey jar and have a bear shaped pear.
Great idea!

-Luke
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