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Old 12-16-2017, 08:44 PM   #21 (permalink)
 
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Default Re: Lowering transplanted sucker failure ratio

No they just like to creep under cool and damp shelters

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Old 12-20-2017, 05:33 PM   #22 (permalink)
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Default Re: Lowering transplanted sucker failure ratio

Did u cut the leaves off before planting those namwah? Could also be an issue....too much transpiration without roots....
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Old 12-21-2017, 06:41 PM   #23 (permalink)
 
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Default Re: Lowering transplanted sucker failure ratio

Yes, all the trunks were cut on the lot with 28% failure. But thanks, I did not know this could be an issue. We have replanted Namwah water suckers on some smaller fields,with their leaves as a test and they do ok, although I do find they are much slower to developp than sword suckers. The main problem being that in the namwah variety I find that, the water suckers and sword suckers are really hard to differenciate
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Old 12-25-2017, 12:53 PM   #24 (permalink)
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Default Re: Lowering transplanted sucker failure ratio

In my experience transplanting namwah/Pisang awak types they have a more moist pstem tissue compared to other varieties. I’m sure you notice picking them up, you feel more “flex” in the pstem. I have found this causes them to rot easier under very moist conditions. They are very hardy once established.

I don’t think the roots would be an issue or the corm healing in the shade. If anything less roots would prevent rot. I also had higher Pisang awak failures. I ended up coping what they do in India. India grows more Pisang Awak than anywhere! They plant the corms higher. Just under the surface! Very shallow! I also chop the pstem down on taller pups to prevent them from falling over due to the shallow planting. I saw a HUGE difference. I now plant almost everything this way.

Since they are shallow I leave room to “earth up” around them. I always wait until they are 3 months old or so. Then i add soil around the corms upto about 4”. This still leaves room to add more and more loose new compost/manure/etc over the growing season. By the end of the year i will have added 8-10”. Since your on a larger scale you may want to add the 8” or so at the 3 month mark.

Test some next planting. I think it will help you a lot. Additional things I’m sure you know. Limit fertilizer until you have a couple leaves established. Also limit irrigation until they are pushing new growth (3-4 weeks).

Good luck!
You have a very nice planting area.
Feel free to PM me. I can try to dig up more info if you need it.
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Old 12-25-2017, 04:30 PM   #25 (permalink)
 
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Default Re: Lowering transplanted sucker failure ratio

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Originally Posted by Tytaylor77 View Post
In my experience transplanting namwah/Pisang awak types they have a more moist pstem tissue compared to other varieties. I’m sure you notice picking them up, you feel more “flex” in the pstem. I have found this causes them to rot easier under very moist conditions. They are very hardy once established.

I don’t think the roots would be an issue or the corm healing in the shade. If anything less roots would prevent rot. I also had higher Pisang awak failures. I ended up coping what they do in India. India grows more Pisang Awak than anywhere! They plant the corms higher. Just under the surface! Very shallow! I also chop the pstem down on taller pups to prevent them from falling over due to the shallow planting. I saw a HUGE difference. I now plant almost everything this way.
Since they are shallow I leave room to “earth up” around them. I always wait until they are 3 months old or so. Then i add soil around the corms upto about 4”. This still leaves room to add more and more loose new compost/manure/etc over the growing season. By the end of the year i will have added 8-10”. Since your on a larger scale you may want to add the 8” or so at the 3 month mark.

Test some next planting. I think it will help you a lot. Additional things I’m sure you know. Limit fertilizer until you have a couple leaves established. Also limit irrigation until they are pushing new growth (3-4 weeks).

Good luck!
You have a very nice planting area.
Feel free to PM me. I can try to dig up more info if you need it.
Many thanks for such a precise and experienced answer. We will apply your advice immediately as we are planting right now and identify the rows with the different planting depth and evaluate. I am also fascinated by your comment about the amount of root. It is now the dry season so the workers have to wet the soil to dig the hole, they then water right after transplanting the pup to settle the earth around the corm . The dew is heavy at the moment and night temperature is down to 8 degrees C but the afternoon sun is hot and afternoon temperature can be 33 C. Daytime humidity is quite low as we are in the north. So do you mean that after this, we should not water at all until a couple of leaves have developped? We have reddish sandy soil with rapid water absorption.

Last edited by louis14 : 12-28-2017 at 02:31 AM.
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Old 02-15-2018, 06:53 AM   #26 (permalink)
 
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Default Re: Lowering transplanted sucker failure ratio

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tytaylor77 View Post
In my experience transplanting namwah/Pisang awak types they have a more moist pstem tissue compared to other varieties. I’m sure you notice picking them up, you feel more “flex” in the pstem. I have found this causes them to rot easier under very moist conditions. They are very hardy once established.

I don’t think the roots would be an issue or the corm healing in the shade. If anything less roots would prevent rot. I also had higher Pisang awak failures. I ended up coping what they do in India. India grows more Pisang Awak than anywhere! They plant the corms higher. Just under the surface! Very shallow! I also chop the pstem down on taller pups to prevent them from falling over due to the shallow planting. I saw a HUGE difference. I now plant almost everything this way.

Since they are shallow I leave room to “earth up” around them. I always wait until they are 3 months old or so. Then i add soil around the corms upto about 4”. This still leaves room to add more and more loose new compost/manure/etc over the growing season. By the end of the year i will have added 8-10”. Since your on a larger scale you may want to add the 8” or so at the 3 month mark.

Test some next planting. I think it will help you a lot. Additional things I’m sure you know. Limit fertilizer until you have a couple leaves established. Also limit irrigation until they are pushing new growth (3-4 weeks).

Good luck!
You have a very nice planting area.
Feel free to PM me. I can try to dig up more info if you need it.

Two months after my first post about sucker failure and thanks to the fabulous advice received on this forum, the ratio is currently down to 2% maybe less, and thus has become negligeable when it was standing at 28%. Selecting only sword suckers, planting them shallow, giving them as little water as possible during the first month has completely changed our outlook on future banana field development.
A BIG THANK YOU to all and especially to Tytaylor77 for your INVALUABLE advice!
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Old 02-15-2018, 08:28 AM   #27 (permalink)
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Joy Lowering transplanted sucker failure ratio

Hi Louis,
Curious if you may have a problem with your soil in some areas. Where you have had failures, have you replanted with new plants and they lived? I had apple trees and always had an area where the trees seemed to die within a few years. after several tries took soil samples and found that there was a natural enzyme in the soils that was killing off the new trees. Removed yards of soil and replaced with new and trees took hold.

Edit your profile and add where you are from.

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Old 02-15-2018, 07:58 PM   #28 (permalink)
 
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Default Re: Lowering transplanted sucker failure ratio

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Hi Louis,
Curious if you may have a problem with your soil in some areas. Where you have had failures, have you replanted with new plants and they lived? I had apple trees and always had an area where the trees seemed to die within a few years. after several tries took soil samples and found that there was a natural enzyme in the soils that was killing off the new trees. Removed yards of soil and replaced with new and trees took hold.

Edit your profile and add where you are from.

Craig
Thanks for your reply,
The failures were spread out in the same field, with no recognizable pattern. We have however improved our transplanting technique since receiving expert advice on this forum and the ratio is currently negligeable. The places where we had failures all now have suckers growing and developping. Check our previous post for our situation update after two months.
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Old 02-16-2018, 07:25 AM   #29 (permalink)
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Default Re: Lowering transplanted sucker failure ratio

Glad to hear you got a handle on your problem.
Good luck and grow bananas.

Craig
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Old 02-16-2018, 08:20 AM   #30 (permalink)
 
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Bananas Brindando Re: Lowering transplanted sucker failure ratio

Quote:
Originally Posted by louis14 View Post
Two months after my first post about sucker failure and thanks to the fabulous advice received on this forum, the ratio is currently down to 2% maybe less, and thus has become negligeable when it was standing at 28%. Selecting only sword suckers, planting them shallow, giving them as little water as possible during the first month has completely changed our outlook on future banana field development.
A BIG THANK YOU to all and especially to Tytaylor77 for your INVALUABLE advice!
Thank you for the update. It is gratifying our comments and instructions were helpful and on target for your problem. Your update verifies that our methods for growing bananas are solid and works. Since most of us, grow bananas outside of their normal tropical growing range, we learned from & by our failures.

About 15 years ago when I first started grow a few bananas, there were NO information available (I looked) on the internet to help new banana growers. Only in the past few years have info started becoming available. ... And even on this forum in the past TWO years have other forum Members started posting their methods & observations for growing bananas in non-tropical zones. Many time against nay-Sayers &/or with some friendly debate of different methods.

We're all still learning, so please continue to post your methods & observations as well as problems that you encounter. These will help us too.
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Old 02-17-2018, 12:03 AM   #31 (permalink)
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Default Re: Lowering transplanted sucker failure ratio

Thank you for the kind words Louis14! Growing is all about sharing info and techniques! I’m glad we could help! Please keep us updated on your success and keep posting pictures!! I wish you great success and growth of your business!

Good Luck!
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Old 04-06-2018, 05:07 AM   #32 (permalink)
 
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Hiya Re: Lowering transplanted sucker failure ratio

The field is doing great now, growing at 100%. The Namwah have been watered three times a week since December and we are now getting welcome evening free irrigation through regular thunderstorms. The rainy season might even come early! Wouldn't that be just great!


This field will shoot up in the next six months, our Namwah grow to fifteen feet!
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Old 04-06-2018, 06:13 AM   #33 (permalink)
 
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The field is looking Great!
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Old 04-17-2018, 07:50 AM   #34 (permalink)
 
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Default Re: Lowering transplanted sucker failure ratio

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Would it be out of the question to establish suckers in pots using soilless potting media before planting in the field? I only mention this because, in my experience, the failure rate for potted suckers is close to zero.
Aruzinsky: Your suggestions did not fall on deaf ears!
Even though our success ratio in the field is close to 100% nowadays, we built a 50m2 test polytunnel shaded with 50% green netting roofed with HDPE so as to control the watering.

We did this as I found the suckers suffered too much from sudden exposure to 100% sunshine, after having developped in the shade of the mother pseudostem. They will wilt and look fragile, even though they are watered three times a week in the dry season; and this for months and months before finally reaching the strategic size that allows them to thrive.

A month ago we readied the polytunnel and put in a cool thousand sword suckers within the following two weeks. Each sucker has been potted in a 50/50 mix of compost and local soil.

The results are absolutely dazzling! The sucker stems stay bright green and I cannot see any failure. Rolled leaves are already popping up everywhere. Once they have more leaves, we will progressively harden them and move them into newly created fields with the rainy season in motion.

This has been a very encouraging experiment and we will now rapidly build a few much more solid, steel-posted hardening tents so as to continue mastering this process.





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Old 04-17-2018, 10:44 PM   #35 (permalink)
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Default Re: Lowering transplanted sucker failure ratio

That’s a Musa army right there!

Your doing an amazing job Louis!
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Old 04-17-2018, 11:21 PM   #36 (permalink)
 
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Default Re: Lowering transplanted sucker failure ratio

We're gonna need a bigger tent!
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Old 04-25-2018, 10:22 AM   #37 (permalink)
 
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Default Re: Lowering transplanted sucker failure ratio



The same field today. Golf anyone?
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