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Old 07-26-2019, 04:03 PM   #1 (permalink)
amiart
 
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Default Which varities might be best able to deal with Allelopathic plants ?

Essentially these plants, (Pine, Black Walnut, Eucalyptus, all poison the ground to eliminate competition from other plants and some (very few) can deal with the chemicals they produce,

I happen to have all three tree types mentioned above . took me years to figure out what was going on in this yard.

So what types / varieties would / could deal with it the best ?


also have excessive heat at times and water restrictions at times.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allelopathy

Allelopathy is a biological phenomenon by which an organism produces one or more biochemicals that influence the germination, growth, survival, and reproduction of other organisms. These biochemicals are known as allelochemicals and can have beneficial (positive allelopathy) or detrimental (negative allelopathy) effects on the target organisms and the community. Allelochemicals are a subset of secondary metabolites,[1] which are not required for metabolism (i.e. growth, development and reproduction) of the allelopathic organism. Allelochemicals with negative allelopathic effects are an important part of plant defense against herbivory.[1][2]

The production of allelochemicals are affected by biotic factors such as nutrients available, and abiotic factors such as temperature and pH.

Allelopathy is characteristic of certain plants, algae, bacteria, coral, and fungi. Allelopathic interactions are an important factor in determining species distribution and abundance within plant communities, and are also thought to be important in the success of many invasive plants. For specific examples, see black crowberry (Empetrum hermaphroditum), spotted knapweed (Centaurea maculosa), garlic mustard (Alliaria petiolata), Casuarina/Allocasuarina spp., and nutsedge.

The process by which a plant acquires more of the available resources (such as nutrients, water or light) from the environment without any chemical action on the surrounding plants is called resource competition. This process is not negative allelopathy, although both processes can act together to enhance the survival rate of the plant species.
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